The New York Times talks about what happens when classical musicians go digital

Thursday Jun 16th, 2016


Blog > The New York Times talks about what happens when classical musicians go digital


 

Matt Haimovitz setting up his score on an iPad before a pop-up concert. Credit: Michael George for The New York Times

At YoungArts, classical music winners are afforded the opportunity to not only learn their craft and to collaborate across disciplines, but to understand where the classical music industry is and, more importantly, where it’s going.
According to a recent article in The New York Times, the latest generation of tablets—which now come in the same size as a standard score—and styluses like the Apple Pencil are having a profound effect on the way performers engage with musical text. “The traditional top-down structure of teaching has been shaken loose. The line between scholarly and practical spheres of influence is becoming blurred. And the very notion of a definitive text is quickly losing traction — and with it, the ideal of that “perfection of execution.”

Read more about this shift and how technology is bringing performers closer to historical sources here.